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Professional Development Workshops

Friday, November 08, 2013

Neurobiology of Disease Workshop: Human Brain Disorders in a Dish: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Disease

Organizer/Moderator: Arnold R. Kriegstein, MD, PhD; Ricardo E. Dolmetsch, PhD
Date & Time: Friday, November 8, 2013 8am - 5pm
Location: 6A

There has been an explosion of interest in using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to model human disease and human development. The excitement over the obvious benefits may need to be tempered with caution concerning unanswered questions about the validity of various disease models as well as concerns over technical issues. With this burst of new information comes an opportunity to take stock of the landscape and integrate the findings into an updated, modern view of human disease exploration. The workshop aims to help frame important unanswered research questions related to iPSC-based disease modeling and stimulate the interest and understanding of investigators new to the field. A reception at the close of the day gives students and faculty the opportunity to interact and explore remaining questions informally. Target audience: graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty.

Preregistration online is required for the Neurobiology of Disease Workshop. The registration fee for the workshop is $35, which includes breakfast, lunch, and a post-workshop reception.

This workshop is currently sold out and is no longer accepting registrants.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Support contributed by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke​.

Short Course #1: Chemo and Optogenetics: Light and Chemical Control of Neuronal Circuits

Organizer/Moderator: Luis de Lecea, PhD
Date & Time: Friday, November 8, 2013 8am - 6pm
Location: 6B

​Optogenetics, a combination of optical and genetic methods that render neurons sensitive to light, has revolutionized systems neuroscience, allowing us to functionally map neuronal circuits with unprecedented precision. Deisseroth, broadly known as the inventor of optogenetics, will review the development of new optogenetic tools that allows us to manipulate neurons and circuits over different time scales. Other speakers will give examples of how optogenetics has allowed establishing causal relationships between the activity of neuronal circuits and complex behaviors. An alternative method, chemogenetics, allows interrogation of neuronal circuits using synthetic ligands. Advantages and comparisons between these two technologies will be discussed.

Preregistration online is required for all Short Courses. Short Course #1 is currently sold out and is no longer accepting registrants.

Short Course Fees
(includes lunch and syllabus book)

Student member $135
Student nonmember $165
Postdoctoral member $200
Postdoctoral nonmember $245
Faculty member $265
Faculty nonmember $325

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Partial support contributed by Bristol-Myers Squibb

Neurobiology of Disease Workshop: Human Brain Disorders in a Dish: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Disease

Organizer/Moderator: Ricardo E. Dolmetsch, PhD; Arnold R. Kriegstein, MD, PhD
Date & Time: Friday, November 8, 2013 8am - 5pm
Location: 6A

There has been an explosion of interest in using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to model human disease and human development. The excitement over the obvious benefits may need to be tempered with caution concerning unanswered questions about the validity of various disease models as well as concerns over technical issues. With this burst of new information comes an opportunity to take stock of the landscape and integrate the findings into an updated, modern view of human disease exploration. The workshop aims to help frame important unanswered research questions related to iPSC-based disease modeling and stimulate the interest and understanding of investigators new to the field. A reception at the close of the day gives students and faculty the opportunity to interact and explore remaining questions informally. Target audience: graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty.

Preregistration online is required for the Neurobiology of Disease Workshop. The registration fee for the workshop is $35, which includes breakfast, lunch, and a post-workshop reception.

This workshop is currently sold out and is no longer accepting registrants.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Support contributed by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke​.

Short Course #2: The Science of Large Data Sets: Spikes, Fields, and Voxels

Organizer/Moderator: Uri Eden, PhD
Date & Time: Friday, November 8, 2013 8:30am - 6:30pm
Location: 6F

Modern methods for imaging and recording brain activity allow us to collect massive amounts of data across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Researchers now routinely record spike trains from hundreds of neurons across multiple brain regions, continuous fields from numerous brain sites over days at a time, and imaging data containing hundreds of gigabytes of information. In order to make use of the exciting new opportunities afforded by this explosion of data, it is imperative for researchers to understand and be able to apply principled statistical methods that take advantage of the structure present in diverse neural datasets. This short course will provide an overview of classic and modern data analysis methods and will cover general principles of signal processing and statistical inference methods, with a focus on three common classes of signals: spike trains, electromagnetic fields at multiple spatial scales, and fMRI data.

Preregistration online is required for all Short Courses.

Short Course Fees
(includes lunch and syllabus book)

Student member $135
Student nonmember $165
Postdoctoral member $200
Postdoctoral nonmember $245
Faculty member $265
Faculty nonmember $325

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Saturday, November 09, 2013

Meet-the-Expert: Session 1

Date & Time: Saturday, November 9, 2013 8am - 9:15am
Location: Manchester Grand Hyatt: Annie, Emma, Ford, Madeleine, Mohsen

Experts will describe their research techniques and accomplishments in a personal context that offers participants a behind-the-scenes look at factors influencing each expert's work. The session offers an opportunity for students and postdoctoral researchers to engage the expert in an informal dialogue over breakfast. No registration is required, but seating is limited

Fred Gage, PhD 
Neuronal Plasticity and Neural Diversity
This discussion will focus on the evidence supporting the birth and maturation of new neurons in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the mammalian brain. The mechanism by which the cells integrate into the dentate gyrus and their functional significance with regard to neural plasticity, will be discussed. In addition, there will be a focus on the recent finding that LINE-1 and Alu retroelements are active in neuronal progenitor cells and the the germline, providing additional mechanisms for neuronal diversification.

Support contributed by Emory University/Yerkes National Primate Research Center

Erik Herzog, PhD
Coordinated Circadian Clocks in the Lab, Classroom, and Clinic
We wake and sleep, eat and fast, on a daily basis. These biological, circadian, rhythms are common across all phyla. In mammals, these rhythms are intrinsic to glia, neurons and many other cell types in the brain and body. How is the mammalian brain organized to generate daily rhythms in physiology and behavior? What happens when environmental or genetic events disrupt normal circadian rhythms? This session will discuss how studies of the network of circadian clocks in the brain and body are revealing insights into how oscillators couple, kids struggle to learn in school, and clinicians may be able to improve patient outcomes in brain cancers, mood disorders and obesity.

George Koob, PhD
The Neurocircuitry of Addiction: From Motivation to Allostasis
Understanding the neural mechanisms of motivation has gained tremendously from our study of the archetypal disturbance of motivation: Addiction. Addiction can be defined as disorder of compulsive drug use with loss of control in intake and the emergence of a negative motivational state during withdrawal. While reward dysregulations have historically have been addressed as breaks with homeostasis in concepts such as sensitization and opponent processes, recent formulations suggest drug addiction is a reward deficit, stress surfeit, executive function disorder that follows an allostatic process rather than a homeostatic process. Our understanding of the neurobiology of addiction is providing valuable insights into the neurobiology of motivation per se and how motivational systems change in psychopathology.

Steve Scott, PhD
Making and Using Robots to Study Sensorimotor Function and Quantify Neurological Impairments
The presentation contains three separate yet intertwined themes. First, I will describe how selecting a less worn path through academic training from engineering to neuroscience can provide unique opportunities for research that spans disciplines and fields. Second, I will describe the development and use of novel robotic technology to quantify and modify limb movement, leading to several new discoveries on the fundamentals of sensorimotor control and impairments associated with stroke and other neurological injuries/disorders. Finally, I will describe how this same technology led to the creation of a start-up company with an objective to create a next generation technology for neurological assessment.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Careers Beyond the Bench

Organizer/Moderator: Elisabeth J Van Bockstaele, PhD
Date & Time: Saturday, November 9, 2013 9am - 11am
Location: 31C

Panelists: Andrew Bean, PhD; Katja Brose, PhD; Joe Hardy, PhD; Bradley Voytek, PhD

The workshop will discuss career trajectories of individuals in non-academic settings. An emphasis will be placed on providing tips to prepare for a career shift, tools for networking, and strategies to build your resume. Panelists will address the following questions: 1. What career trajectories are available with an MS vs PhD in neuroscience? 2. What are the most effective strategies for transitioning into a non-academic research career? 3. What qualifications, skills and traits are needed for a career in science communication? 4. What are the skills that ‘tech' companies are looking for and how to use social and real-life networking to help make a career transition.

This workshop will be disseminated as online content on SfN.org.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Success in Academia

Organizer/Moderator: Patsy S Dickinson, PhD
Date & Time: Saturday, November 9, 2013 9am - 11am
Location: 30C

Panelists: Darcy Kelley, PhD; Kimberly McAllister, PhD, Donald Partridge, PhD; Aras Petrulis, PhD; Bill Wright, PhD

The goal of this workshop is to present an overview of the factors that lead to success in a variety of academic institutions. Panelists will include successful neuroscientists at institutions ranging from small liberal arts colleges to top research-oriented universities. They will consider the types of activities and attributes that are important in achieving success in their institutions, describe the paths that led them to their current positions, and answer questions from members of the audience.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Meet-the-Expert: Session 2

Date & Time: Saturday, November 9, 2013 9:30am - 10:45am
Location: Manchester Grand Hyatt: Annie, Emma, Ford, Madeleine, Mohsen

Christine Gall, PhD
Building a Substrate Map for Memory Encoding at Single Synapses
Advances in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underlying enduring synaptic plasticity, and in particular long-term potentiation (LTP), have provided opportunities to address specific, and long held, questions about memory encoding. How are neuromodulatory substances (e.g., BDNF, estrogen) involved? Where are the links broken in learning disorders? Can the analysis of synaptic signaling be used to map the loci of memory encoding (engrams)? This session will focus on how insight into the mechanisms of LTP, and advances in light microscopy, are being used to address these questions and others pertaining to enduring functional plasticity in adult brain.

Paul Glimcher, PhD
Learning to be an Interdisciplinary Scientist at the Border of the Natural and Social Sciences
More and more neuroscientists find themselves working in highly inter-disciplinary environments where a thorough knowledge of other scientific approaches can make the difference between high-impact successes and near-total failure. How does one gain deep expertise in another discipline? How can one learn to 'see' a problem through the eyes of a scientist who has been trained in a completely different way? This session will offer an overview of Glimcher's path from physiologist to economist-neuroscientist highlighting both the challenges and opportunities that collaborations with social scientists can provide.

Bryan Roth, MD, PhD
Translating Basic Discoveries into Neurotherapeutics
In this session emerging technologies for translating basic science discoveries into new therapies for neuropsychiatric diseases will be discussed. A case-study approach will be used to illustrate how we can discover potential therapeutics for both rare, single-gene disorders in the autism-spectrum and for relatively common, polygenic disorders like schizophrenia. Additionally, the potential translational potential of newly developed synthetic biology tools such as DREADDs will be discussed.

Hongjun Song, PhD
Understanding Neural Stem Cells and Neurogenesis: One Cell at a Time
Knowledge of neural stem cell properties and neurogenesis is fundamental to our understanding neural development and brain disorders with developmental origins. This session will discuss multidisciplinary approaches for addressing basic questions in mammalian neurogenesis in vivo, from prospective clonal analysis of individual adult neural stem cell behavior, to “single-cell” genetic manipulation of proliferating neural progenitors, seamless reconstruction of complex axonal projections of individual newborn neurons, to circuit regulation of neurogenesis in response to animal experience.

Rachel Wilson, PhD
Small Brain, Big Problems
The focus of the Wilson laboratory is (1) to understand some of the computations that occur in the early stages of sensory processing, and (2) to describe the cellular, synaptic, and circuit mechanisms underlying these computations. We use Drosophila as a model organism to investigate these questions, but because some of the fundamental problems of early sensory processing are likely to be common to all species, we believe that some of the lessons we learn from this simple brain will provide clues to understanding similar problems in more complex brains. This session will discuss recent findings from the laboratory, as well as general considerations relating to the use of simple nervous systems to understand fundamental principles of circuit function.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Research Careers in Industry and the Private Sector

Organizer/Moderator: Gretchen L Snyder, PhD
Date & Time: Saturday, November 9, 2013 1pm - 3pm
Location: 30C

Panelists: Pamala Adams, MS; Taleen Hanania, PhD; J.P. Johnson, PhD; Kenneth Maynard, PhD; Elizabeth Rex, PhD

Research opportunities for neuroscientists in the commercial world have increased due to the growth of the biotech industry and the commercialization of academic-based technology. This workshop will showcase competitive and exciting research careers in diverse settings including innovative biotechs, contract research organizations, and large pharmaceutical companies. Participants will relate their experiences in conducting research with a commercial goal and will advise on issues such as job-seeking strategies and mid-career transitions from bench science into management/business tracks.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Getting the Most Out of SfN: The Annual Meeting and Beyond

Organizer/Moderator: David R. Riddle, PhD; Noah J. Sandstrom, PhD; Hermes H Yeh, PhD
Date & Time: Saturday, November 9, 2013 1pm - 2pm
Location: 31C

Students and others new to the annual meeting are invited to this session where experienced participants will share tips on how to get the most out of the annual meeting experience, both during and after Neuroscience 2013. Whether you are looking for networking strategies or simply ways to make your experience productive and enjoyable, this session will be beneficial. The SfN Program Committee, SfN Committee on Neuroscience Departments and Programs, and the Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience will provide strategies for navigating the annual meeting, discuss professional development tools available during and after the meeting, and answer questions.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Challenges in Neuroscience Training

Organizer/Moderator: Michael S. Levine, PhD; Konrad E. Zinsmaier, PhD; Barbara Lom, PhD
Date & Time: Saturday, November 9, 2013 2pm - 5pm
Location: 11B

Panelists: John Bixby, PhD; Michael Friedlander,PhD; David Morilak, PhD; Rae Nishi, PhD;Jennifer Raymond, PhD; Alan Sved, PhD

Higher education and scientific research landscapes are changing dramatically, affecting how undergraduate and graduate programs prepare the next generation of neuroscientists. This workshop features two panel discussions examining major issues and best practices in neuroscience education such as research funding, program assessment, diversity, pedagogy, mentoring, and career development. One discussion will be led by a panel of graduate program directors, while the other will feature university administrators sharing their perspectives on neuroscience education.

This workshop will be disseminated as online content on SfN.org.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Tackling Bias: Best Practices for Recruiting and Retaining a Diverse Faculty

Organizer/Moderator: Jill B. Becker, PhD; Kathie L. Olsen, PhD; Anne M. Etgen, PhD
Date & Time: Saturday, November 9, 2013 2:30pm - 5pm
Location: 31C

SfN provides concrete strategies for recruitment, advancement, and creating a favorable work climate for female faculty and faculty from diverse backgrounds in neuroscience. This interactive workshop will use IWiN materials to present data showing that while implicit bias affects the progress of women and underrepresented minorities in science, it can be mitigated. Speakers will discuss concrete steps you can take to contain and minimize the influence of implicit bias on evaluation.

This workshop will be disseminated as online content on SfN.org.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Tackling Bias: Best Practices for Recruiting and Retaining a Diverse Faculty

Organizer/Moderator: Kathie L. Olsen, PhD; Jill B. Becker, PhD; Anne M. Etgen, PhD
Date & Time: Saturday, November 9-Monday, November 11, 2013 2:30pm - 5pm
Location: 31C

Panelist: Randy Nelson, PhD

SfN provides concrete strategies for recruitment, advancement, and creating a favorable work climate for female faculty and faculty from diverse backgrounds in neuroscience. This interactive workshop will use IWiN materials to present data showing that while implicit bias affects the progress of women and underrepresented minorities in science, it can be mitigated. Speakers will discuss concrete steps you can take to contain and minimize the influence of implicit bias on evaluation.

This workshop will be disseminated as online content on SfN.org.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

NIH Funding and You: A Practical Guide to Surviving and Thriving in Your Research Career

Organizer/Moderator: Stephen Korn, PhD
Date & Time: Saturday, November 9, 2013 3:30pm - 5pm
Location: 30C

Panelists: Nancy Desmond, PhD; Michelle Jones-London, PhD; Dennis Twombly, PhD; Alan Willard, PhD

This workshop will discuss factors that NIH staff has found to be important to the success of trainees in the realm of both training itself and grantwriting . Funding opportunities will be discussed in the context of different issues that arise for different funding mechanisms that contribute to successful and unsuccessful applications. Brief talks will be followed by an extensive question and answer session.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Career Development Topics: A Mentoring and Networking Event

Date & Time: Saturday, November 9, 2013 7:30pm - 10pm
Location: Hall A

Experienced neuroscientists will be on hand to offer mentoring on a wide range of topics in an informal, roundtable format. Topics include work-life balance, securing grants, career transitions, careers away from the bench, choosing graduate schools of postdoctoral fellow positions, and many others. Participants from diverse backgrounds, fields, and work sectors are encouraged to attend.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Sunday, November 10, 2013

The NIH Grants System and Peer Review: Practical Advice for Early and Mid-Career Researchers: Session 1, Early Career Investigators

Organizer/Moderator: Rene Etcheberrigaray, MD
Date & Time: Sunday, November 10, 2013 8:30am - 10am
Location: 31C

Panelists: David Armstrong, PhD; Albert Avila, PhD; Neil Buckholtz, PhD; John Glowa, PhD; James Gnadt, PhD; Susan Koester, PhD; Ernest Lyons, PhD; Roger Miller, PhD; Richard Nakamura, PhD; Nancy Pilotte, PhD; Michael Steinmetz, PhD

This is an overview of the roles of the Center for Scientific Review (CSR) and Institutes with neuroscience portfolios. Presentations will include a detailed explanation of the “life-cycle” of a grant application, including the programmatic perspective and dealing with a difficult funding climate. At the end, panelists will participate in a town-hall style and break-out sessions for questions and answers.


This workshop will be disseminated as online content on SfN.org.


Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Graduate School Fair

Date & Time: Sunday, November 10, 2013 12pm - 2pm
Location: Sails Pavilion

The Society for Neuroscience and the Committee on Neuroscience Departments and Programs invite you to meet face-to-face with student advisors, program faculty, and graduate schools and representatives at the second annual Graduate School Fair

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

NSF News You Can Use: Exploring Funding Opportunities for Research and Training

Organizer/Moderator: Diane Witt, PhD
Date & Time: Sunday, November 10, 2013 2pm - 4pm
Location: 30C

Come hear the latest word from NSF Program officers on funding opportunities for neuroscientists, including all areas of basic neuroscience research and networking, education and training, career development opportunities, and large-scale multidisciplinary centers. Guidance will be provided for managing your data and developing a Data Management Plan required for all NSF full proposals. Talk with neuroscientists who have been successful in receiving NSF funding. General information about the agency, the review process, and tips for writing successful proposals will also be presented. NSF maintains an exhibit booth featuring relevant publications and program officers available on site for extended conversation.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Making the Most of Your International Training

Organizer/Moderator: Michael J. Zigmond, PhD
Date & Time: Sunday, November 10, 2013 2pm - 5pm
Location: 31C

Panelists: Laura Coglin, PhD; Willie Daniels, PhD; Beth Fischer, PhD; Shigang He, PhD; Yuan Liu, PhD; Kathy Michels, PhD; Viji Ravindranath, PhD; Gonzalo Torress, PhD; Joe Whittaker, PhD

This session will discuss how best to use your experience as a graduate student, postdoctoral trainee, or your sabbatical to move your career forward. Special attention will be paid to maximizing the experience of individuals from developing countries who spend time in a developed country. Issues to be considered include how to select a lab, research questions, and methods that will be of the greatest assistance. Panelists will include advisors and present and former trainees. Time will be provided for small group discussion.

This workshop will be disseminated as online content on SfN.org.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Monday, November 11, 2013

Teaching Neuroscience: Is the Printed Textbook Obsolete?

Organizer/Moderator: Richard F Olivo, PhD
Date & Time: Monday, November 11, 2013 9am - 11am
Location: 31C

Panelists: John H. Byrne, PhD; Sydney Carroll; David B. Daniel, PhD; Robert V. Prior; Leonard E. White, PhD

Will digital textbooks replace print? Do they foster better learning? We will have answers from Bob Prior (The MIT Press), “Academic Publishing in the Digital Age;” Sydney Carrol (Sinauer Associates), “Textbooks in Multiple Formats: What Do Students Choose?” John Byrne (University of Texas), “An Open-Access Online Textbook for Neuroscience;” David Daniel (James Madison University), “Electronic Textbooks: Why the Rush?” and Len White (Duke University), “Are MOOCs Tomorrow's Textbooks?”

This workshop will be disseminated as online content on SfN.org.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

A Guide to Journal Publishing

Organizer/Moderator: Verity J. Brown, PhD; Shamus O'Reilly, PhD
Date & Time: Monday, November 11, 2013 9am - 12pm
Location: 30C

Panelists: Toby Charkin, PhD; Jud Dunham, PhD; Daniel Morgan, PhD; Michael Rugg, PhD; Randall Sakai, PhD; Kim Wallen, PhD

Journals form a core part of the process of scholarly communication and are an integral part of scientific research itself. Journals exist to disseminate new research findings and the latest new thinking to scholarly and professional communities worldwide. This workshop will present a rare opportunity to gain insight into journal publishing from Elsevier Publishing staff and editors including Professors Verity Brown (Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews), Michael Rugg (Neuropsychologia), Randall Sakai (Physiology & Behavior), and Kim Wallen (EiC Hormones and Behavior). We will cover a myriad of topics including authorship, reviewing, open access, and innovation around the journal experience. There will be ample opportunity for your questions.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Actively Managing Your Career: What They Didn't Teach You in School

Organizer/Moderator: Marty Nemko, PhD
Date & Time: Monday, November 11, 2013 12pm - 2:30pm
Location: 31C

You have the “hard” skills needed to advance your research, but have you mastered the “soft skills” that are equally important for career success? This workshop offers practical advice and tactics to help you navigate an increasingly complex and competitive environment — from creating a personal mission statement to gaining skills for effective time management, communications, networking, finding and leveraging mentors, negotiating to get what you want, and more. Learn how actively managing your career and life can lead to increased satisfaction and success. Marty Nemko is an acclaimed career coach, author, blogger, and radio host with a PhD in educational psychology. His most recent book is How to Do Life: What They Didn't Teach You In School.

This workshop will be disseminated as online content on SfN.org.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Graduate School Fair

Organizer/Moderator: The Society for Neuroscience
Date & Time: Monday, November 11, 2013 12pm - 2pm
Location: Sails Pavilion

The Society for Neuroscience and the Committee on Neuroscience Departments and Programs invite you to meet face-to-face with student advisors, program faculty, and graduate schools and representatives at the second annual Graduate School Fair.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Transitioning Beyond the Postdoc: Workshop for Early-Career Investigators

Organizer/Moderator: Nancy S. Pilotte, PhD
Date & Time: Tuesday, November 12, 2013 6:30pm - 9pm
Location: San Diego Marriott Marquis: Salon D

Ideal for those at the end of their postdoctoral fellowships, this workshop includes what you should consider when looking for a faculty position; how a potential employer might evaluate you (presented by the chair of a major neuroscience department); how to establish a laboratory (presented by the director of an NIH intramural program); and how to make a first grant application successful. Presenters: N. Pilotte, NIDA; P. Kalivas, MUSC; A. Bonci; NIDA; R. Sorensen, NIDA; H. Gordon, NIDA. Details: https://www.seiservices.com/nida/frontiers2013/

Transitioning Beyond the Postdoc: Workshop for Early-Career Investigators

Organizer/Moderator: Nancy S Pilotte, PhD
Date & Time: Tuesday, November 12, 2013 6:30pm - 9pm
Location: San Diego Marriott Marquis: Salon D

Ideal for those at the end of their postdoctoral fellowships, this workshop includes what you should consider when looking for a faculty position; how a potential employer might evaluate you (presented by the chair of a major neuroscience department); how to establish a laboratory (presented by the director of an NIH intramural program); and how to make a first grant application successful. Presenters: N. Pilotte, NIDA; P. Kalivas, MUSC; A. Bonci; NIDA; R. Sorensen, NIDA; H. Gordon, NIDA. Details: https://www.seiservices.com/nida/frontiers2013/