SfN Preconference Sessions

SfN Preconference Sessions are sessions sponsored by the Society that occur prior to the official start of the annual meeting.  Paid registration is required for Short Courses and the Neurobiology of Disease Workshop. To attend, add the appropriate course to your annual meeting registration.

 

No separate registration is needed for the Meet-the-Expert Series and the Meet-the-Clinician Expert session; however, space is limited. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early for their priority session.  Visit Neuronline in Spring 2018 for resources and live professional development opportunities inspired by this event. 

 

 

SfN Preconference Sessions Fees

 

Short Courses 1 and 2

(Includes electronic syllabus and lunch)

Student member-----------$150

Student nonmember------$225

Postdoctoral member-----$225

Faculty member------------$295

Faculty nonmember-------$445

 

Short Course 3

(Includes electronic syllabus)

Student member----------$100

Student nonmember-----$150

Postdoctoral member----$150

Faculty member-----------$200

Faculty Nonmember------$300

 

Neurobiology of Disease Workshop

(Includes electronic syllabus, breakfast, and lunch)

Student attendee----------$85

Postdoctoral attendee----$150

Faculty attendee-----------$300 

 

 


Friday, November 10, 2017

NEUROBIOLOGY OF DISEASE WORKSHOP: Gene Therapy to Address Unmet Needs in Neurology

Organizer/Moderator: Florian Eichler, MD, Xandra O Breakefield, PhD
Support contributed by: The National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, NIH: the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; and the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH
Date & Time: Friday, November 10, 2017 8am - 5pm
Location: 146C

Panelists: Charlotte J Sumner, MD; Karen Aboody, MD; Eloise Hudry, PhD; Miguel Sena-Esteves, PhD; David P Corey, PhD; Martin Ingelsson, MD, PhD; Robert Brown, MD; Jeff Chamberlain, PhD; Paola Grandi, PhD

This workshop embraces the breadth of "gene therapy" including viral vectors, oligonucleotides, and cell therapies used in promising preclinical studies and clinical trials for a variety of neurologic disorders long thought to be incurable. These new methods involve DNA engineering, gene replacement using virus vectors and the patient's own genetically modified cells, oligonucleotides that can "revive" beneficial gene functions or suppress toxic ones, and viruses and cells armed to tackle brain tumors.Paid registration is required for this course. To attend, add the appropriate course to your annual meeting registration.

SHORT COURSE 2: Neuroinformatics in the Age of Big Data: Working With the Right Data and Tools

Organizer/Moderator: Angela Jane Roskams, PhD, Katja Brose, PhD
Date & Time: Friday, November 10, 2017 8am - 6pm
Location: Ballroom B

Panelists: Jean-Baptiste Poline, PhD; Trygve Bakken, MD, PhD; Paul Pavlidis, PhD; Sean L Hill, PhD; Joshua T Vogelstein; Jennifer D. Whitesell, PhD; Kenneth D Harris, PhD; Katrin Amunts, MD, PhD

We are at a unique time in history where global large-scale projects are generating an unprecedented amount of data. Although much of this data is "open" and available - with analysis tools developed by a new generation of neuroinformaticians - some is still just beyond the reach of many neuroscientists. Here we bring together leaders in the neuroinformatics field to guide attendees (armed with a laptop) through a hands-on course highlighting some of the most broadly accessible open datasets and to help them embark on their independent scientific voyage of discovery.
*This course will include demonstrations and tutorials using technical computing software (R-Studio, Python, Matlab). Participants should have baseline proficiency with these types of software in order to get the most out of the course. Paid registration is required for this course. To attend, add the appropriate course to your annual meeting registration.

SHORT COURSE 1: Intersections Between Brain and Immune System in Health and Disease

Organizer/Moderator: Carla Shatz, PhD, Beth A Stevens, PhD
Support contributed by: Lilly USA
Date & Time: Friday, November 10, 2017 8:30am - 6pm
Location: Ballroom A

Panelists: Shane A Liddelow, PhD; Marco Colonna, MD; Dan Littman, MD, PhD; Maiken Nedergaard, MD, DMSc; Stephen Hauser, MD

The goal of this short course is to bring together researchers to discuss the mediators, mechanisms, and functional implications of neural-immune crosstalk in health and disease. Faculty will highlight new tools and approaches with which to study and model neural-immune signaling in different contexts, including human disease. Topics include: interactions between the brain and the periphery, reactive gliosis and glymphatic-lymphatic connections, microglia function and dysfunction, microbiome and gut-brain axis, immune mechanisms of synapse loss in development and disease. Paid registration is required for this course. To attend, add the appropriate course to your annual meeting registration.

SHORT COURSE 3: Neuroethics and Public Engagement: Why, How, and Best Practices

Organizer/Moderator: Emily Cloyd, Laura Cabrera, PhD, Martha J Farah, PhD
Date & Time: Friday, November 10, 2017 1pm - 5:30pm
Location: 206

Public education and engagement are crucial in the process of assessing and applying societal values to the risks and benefits of neuroscience and the ethical dimensions they involve. Through lectures, case study discussion, and hands-on practice, attendees will explore what neuroethics is and why public engagement is a key component of the field, as well as develop ideas for how to engage with the public regarding their own research. Paid registration is required for this course. To attend, add the appropriate course to your annual meeting registration.

Saturday, November 11, 2017

Meet-the-Expert, Session 1: Amy Bastian - Closing the Loop: From Motor Neuroscience to Rehabilitation


Date & Time: Saturday, November 11, 2017 8am - 9:15am
Location: Renaissance Washington DC Downtown Hotel - Room 9

Panelists: Amy J Bastian, PhD

Amy Bastian's group focuses on understanding how humans learn and control movement. Her laboratory works to identify how new movement patterns are normally acquired, retained, and generalized, and how distinct brain lesions alter these processes. The ultimate goal of her work is to use this information to improve rehabilitation for individuals with neurological damage. In this session, she will discuss how she built a research program aimed at defining a mechanistic approach to neurorehabilitation and some of the advantages and challenges of studying human behavior. No separate registration is required; however, space is limited. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early.

Meet-the-Expert, Session 1: Damien Fair - Examining the Development of the Functional Connectome With Non-Invasive Neuroimaging


Date & Time: Saturday, November 11, 2017 8am - 9:15am
Location: Renaissance Washington DC Downtown Hotel - Room 2

Panelists: Damien A Fair, PhD

Damien Fair's laboratory focuses on mechanisms and principles that underlie the developing brain. The majority of this work uses functional MRI techniques, along with computational tools, such as graph theory, to assess typical and atypical populations. His work cuts across both human and animal models using these non-invasive tools as a bridge between species. A second focus involves testing the feasibility of using these techniques in translational studies of development. Dr. Fair is exploring ways to better characterize individuals to help guide future diagnostic, therapeutic, and genetic studies. He will discuss his research and the moments and people that have influenced his career trajectory. No separate registration is required; however, space is limited. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early.

Meet-the-Expert, Session 1: Roberta Brinton - Shifting the Bench to Bedside Paradigm Towards Translational Validity


Support contributed by: MilliporeSigma
Date & Time: Saturday, November 11, 2017 8am - 9:15am
Location: Renaissance Washington DC Downtown Hotel - Room 4

Panelists: Roberta Brinton, PhD

In the 21st century, there is not a single cure for a single neurodegenerative disease. The translational success of basic science discovery to clinical efficacy has been highly variable, with failure as the most consistent outcome. The failure rate of Phase 2 to Phase 3 clinical trials for nervous system diseases ranges from 85–100 percent depending on the neurological disease, mechanistic target, and therapeutic goal (disease modifying to recovery of function). Neurodegenerative diseases are complex systems biology challenges that typically have multiple stages of progression from early prodromal to end-stage incapacity. The time course for neurodegeneration can progress rapidly, as in ALS, or can span decades, as in Alzheimer's. Dr. Brinton will discuss her translational science experiences that include systems biology discovery science to translational IND enabling research to clinical trials. She will share lessons learned and strategies to conduct discovery science with greater translational validity. No separate registration is required; however, space is limited. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early.

Meet-the-Expert, Session 1: Serena Dudek - Insights Into Hippocampal Circuitry and Function From Studies of Synaptic Plasticity


Support contributed by: MilliporeSigma
Date & Time: Saturday, November 11, 2017 8am - 9:15am
Location: Renaissance Washington DC Downtown Hotel - Room 8

Panelists: Serena M Dudek, PhD

Serena Dudek is perhaps best known for her work establishing long-term depression (LTD) as a legitimate form of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. These studies were initially aimed at determining how excitatory synapses are systematically weakened and eventually lost in normal development and in response to sensory manipulation during critical periods of postnatal development. Although Dudek continued to study synapse pruning and activity-dependent gene transcription, she will discuss how her interest in critical period plasticity has led her to an unexpected place: the long-neglected and enigmatic hippocampal area CA2. No separate registration is required; however, space is limited. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early.

Meet-the-Clinician-Expert, Session 2: Edward Chang - Microdissecting the Function of Human Speech Cortex


Date & Time: Saturday, November 11, 2017 9:30am - 10:45am
Location: Renaissance Washington DC Downtown Hotel - Room 5

Panelists: Edward F Chang, MD

Dr. Chang will discuss the unique role of neurologists, neurosurgeons, and neuroscientists in human intracranial research. He will give highlights from his own work on speech mechanisms and also discuss ethics and training related to the field in general. No separate registration is required; however, space is limited. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early.

Meet-the-Expert, Session 2: Emery Brown - Life Balance in Academic Medicine: Confessions of a Physician-Scientist


Date & Time: Saturday, November 11, 2017 9:30am - 10:45am
Location: Renaissance Washington DC Downtown Hotel - Room 9

Panelists: Emery Neal Brown, MD, PhD

Emery Brown is an anesthesiologist-statistician who combines the clinical practice of anesthesiology with research on the neuroscience mechanisms of general anesthesia and on the development of signal processing algorithms to analyze neuroscience data. In this session, Dr. Brown will discuss his career trajectory as a physician-scientist; balancing work and family; his use of clinical practice to stimulate research and vice versa; and how in today's big data era, scientists and clinicians should train in data analysis and statistical reasoning. No separate registration is required; however, space is limited. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early.

Meet-the-Expert, Session 2: Kathryn Cunningham - Serotonin Matters: Novel Strategies for NeuroTherapeutics in Addictive Disorders


Support contributed by: ACS Chemical Neuroscience
Date & Time: Saturday, November 11, 2017 9:30am - 10:45am
Location: Renaissance Washington DC Downtown Hotel - Room 4

Panelists: Kathryn A Cunningham, PhD

Kathryn Cunningham is a pharmacologist and neuroscientist with a focus on advancing the biological understanding of addictive disorders and developing effective and safe therapeutics to maximize human function. Her cross-disciplinary team of chemists, cell biologists, and clinical scientists has identified that vulnerability to addiction and relapse are mechanistically linked to an imbalance of serotonin signaling through localized to corticostriatal circuitry. Dr. Cunningham will discuss the evolution of this research from animals to humans and the ongoing drug discovery initiatives to restore homeostasis and mitigate deleterious behaviors that promote relapse. No separate registration is required; however, space is limited. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early.

Meet-the-Expert, Session 2: Miriam B. Goodman - Found in Transduction: Neurons and Ion Channels That Sense Touch


Support contributed by: MilliporeSigma
Date & Time: Saturday, November 11, 2017 9:30am - 10:45am
Location: Renaissance Washington DC Downtown Hotel - Room 2

Panelists: Miriam B Goodman, PhD

Touch is the earliest sense to develop and the last to fade and helps to define our sense of the world. Dr. Goodman investigates the biophysics of neuron-skin complexes and ion channels that give rise to tactile perceptions. She works with engineers and physicists to develop new experimental tools, and her research integrates studies of molecules, cells, and animals. Dr. Goodman will discuss her passion for sensory physiology and the importance and joy of being a maker in the neuroscience laboratory. No separate registration is required; however, space is limited. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early.

Meet-the-Expert, Session 2: Rafael Malach - Chasing Neuronal Images in the Human Cerebral Cortex


Date & Time: Saturday, November 11, 2017 9:30am - 10:45am
Location: Renaissance Washington DC Downtown Hotel - Room 8

Panelists: Rafael Malach, PhD

Formal scientific publications typically report the final outcomes and conclusions of what, in reality, is a process full of dead-ends, depressing no-goes, and a fluid mix of thrilling and painful outcomes often contradicting beloved theories. Dr. Malach will describe examples from such behind-the-scenes drama that took place while his group chased after the neuronal events underlying the emergence of a visual object in the mind of a human observer. It is Dr. Malach's hope that such examples may be helpful to young scientists. No separate registration is required; however, space is limited. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early.