Professional Development Workshops

Professional Development Workshops
Friday, October 16, 2015

NEUROBIOLOGY OF DISEASE WORKSHOP: Human Brain Malformations: From Genetics to Therapeutics

Organizer/Moderator: Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD, Peter B. Crino, MD, PhD
Support contributed by: Support contributed by: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH. Content of this workshop does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
Date & Time: Friday, October 16, 2015 8am - 5pm
Location: S100B

Neurobiology of Disease Workshop fees.....$35
(Includes breakfast, lunch, and reception)

Brain malformations, especially those affecting the cerebral cortex, are common causes of intellectual disability and epilepsy. Recent advances in genetics, imaging, and cell biology have substantially increased our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying cortical development and how it can go awry. In this workshop, leading experts will review some of the genes, cellular pathways, processes, and structures commonly affected in brain malformations including PI3K/mTOR signaling, tubulin, reelin, and cilia.

Note: Preregistration is required for the Neurobiology of Disease Workshop. Visit SfN.org to register.

Contact: training@sfn.org

SHORT COURSE #1: Using iPS Cells and Reprogramming to Model Neural Development and Disease

Organizer/Moderator: Kevin Eggan, PhD
Support contributed by: Partial support contributed by: Education grant from Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc. and Lundbeck
Date & Time: Friday, October 16, 2015 8am - 6pm
Location: S401

Workshop Fees
Short Courses 1 and 2
(Includes electronic syllabus and lunch)

Student member............$150
Student nonmember.........$225
Postdoctoral member.......$225
Faculty member............$295
Faculty nonmember.........$445

Stem cell and reprogramming technologies offer exciting opportunities to access human brain cell types and even tissues for studies of development and disease. As methods and techniques for both stem cell differentiation and transcription factor induced reprogramming evolve, the robustness, reproducibility, and utility of these methods continues to improve. In this short course, leaders in developing and implementing these approaches will discuss their work with a view to help attendees utilize these approaches in their own research. Specifically, we will cover the generation of neural cell types from pluripotent stem cells and, by direct reprogramming/trans-differentiation, new methods for three dimensional culture, genome editing and use of these approaches in the design of disease-relevant assay systems.

Note: Preregistration is required for all Short Courses. Visit SfN.org to register.

Contact: training@sfn.org

SHORT COURSE #2: The Impact of Human Genetics and Genomics in Neurobiology: From Disease Discovery to Fundamental Mechanisms (and Back)

Organizer/Moderator: Nicholas Katsanis, PhD
Date & Time: Friday, October 16, 2015 8:30am - 6pm
Location: S406A

Workshop Fees
Short Courses 1 and 2
(Includes electronic syllabus and lunch)
Student member............$150
Student nonmember.........$225
Postdoctoral member.......$225
Faculty member............$295
Faculty nonmember.........$445

The accessibility of whole exome and whole genome sequencing for a variety of clinical indications is a significant scientific achievement. These technologies have already produced thousands of exomes and partial genomes from humans and model organisms, showing the amount and types of genetic variation that exists between individuals and within populations. The sheer number of individuals sequenced has begun to offer the statistical power needed to understand the genetic architecture of both rare and complex disorders. The use of these technologies around the globe has changed the types of questions being asked and the method by which these questions are being pursued. However, significant conceptual and technical challenges remain. This short course will explore how current genomic tools and platforms are used for rare and common disorders, describe what analytic tools and approaches might be most appropriate for specific questions, and consider how genomic, phenotypic, and functional evidence can accelerate both fundamental discovery and application.

Note: Preregistration is required for all Short Courses. Visit SfN.org to register.

Contact: training@sfn.org

SHORT COURSE #3: Optimizing Experimental Design for High-Quality Science

Organizer/Moderator: Mara Dierssen, PhD, MD, Rae Nishi, PhD, Magda Giordano, PhD, John Ngai, PhD, Chris J. McBain, PhD, Charles Mobbs, PhD
Date & Time: Friday, October 16, 2015 1pm - 5:30pm
Location: N227

Panelists: Ronald Landis, PhD; Mary E. Harrington, PhD; Katja Brose, PhD; Shai Silberberg, PhD

Workshop Fees
Short Course 3
(Includes electronic syllabus and lunch)
Student member............$100
Student nonmember.........$150
Postdoctoral member.......$150
Faculty member............$200
Faculty nonmember.........$300

The scientific community has become increasingly concerned about issues related to data reproducibility and experimental design. Issues include, but are not limited to: bias for positive results, the “p-hacking” effect, lack of sufficient replication of experiments, pooling data from different experiments, lack of randomization and/or blinding, chance observations, data selection, group compilation, and lack of rigorous training in statistics and analysis. Attendees will learn experimental and analytical design elements that are crucial for the interpretation of neuroscience research results, such as methodological parameters that can introduce bias, influence robustness, or may be subject to biological variability, and the biological and sociological underpinnings of scientific bias. Existing policies on data deposition and presentation will additionally be covered. Lectures will be interspersed with small group discussion opportunities to allow ample time for the examination of case studies.

Note: Preregistration is required for all Short Courses. Visit SfN.org to register.

Contact: profdev@sfn.org

Saturday, October 17, 2015

Meet-the-Expert: Session 1


Date & Time: Saturday, October 17, 2015 8am - 9:15am
Location: Hyatt Regency Chicago Downtown (not connected to McCormick Place): Various Rooms

Panelists: Ravi Allada, MD; Matteo Carandini, PhD; Z. Josh Huang; William J. Martin, PhD; John F. Cryan, PhD

Experts will describe their research techniques and accomplishments in a personal context that offers participants a behind-the-scenes look at factors influencing each expert's work. The session will offer an opportunity for students and postdoctoral researchers to engage the expert in an informal dialogue over breakfast. No registration is required, but seating is limited.
Contact: training@sfn.org

Careers Beyond the Bench

Organizer/Moderator: Elisabeth J. Van Bockstaele, PhD
Support contributed by: Support contributed by: AbbVie, Inc.
Date & Time: Saturday, October 17, 2015 9am - 11am
Location: S106

Panelists: Mark D. Benton, BS; Victoria Prince, PhD; Daphney Jean, PhD; Andrew J. Castiglioni, PhD

The Careers Beyond the Bench workshop will highlight career paths outside of academia. This year's workshop include presentations from: 1) An NIH Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training (BEST) award recipient on how to effectively build a training program to prepare trainees for careers beyond academia, 2) A clinical research scientist discussing strategies and skill sets needed for pursuing a clinical career, 3) A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science talking about guiding a career outside of academia, 4) And a scientist who moved from a PhD in Neuroscience to Global Security Science.

Contact: mpd@sfn.org

Success in Academia: What's Your Strategy to Thrive?

Organizer/Moderator: Tracy L. Bale, PhD
Date & Time: Saturday, October 17, 2015 9am - 11am
Location: S104

Panelists: Carla J. Shatz, PhD; Tom Insel, MD; Eric J. Nestler, MD, PhD; Huda Akil, PhD

Science in academia is an exciting and engaging career — no two days are the same. But how do you develop short-term and long-term plans to really succeed and make the most out of opportunities? You need to have a strategy to thrive in this environment. These leaders in neuroscience will discuss their approaches to success and offer suggestions across stages of career development. Are you wondering what grants you should be writing? How much or how little time you should spend on service and committee work? The top 10 reasons you are not getting tenure? What are the myths and legends of getting that job offer? Questions can be electronically submitted during the session and answered by the panelists in real time!

Contact: mpd@sfn.org

Meet-the-Expert: Session 2


Date & Time: Saturday, October 17, 2015 9:30am - 10:45am
Location: Hyatt Regency Chicago Downtown (not connected to McCormick Place): Various Rooms

Panelists: Jeff S. Diamond, PhD; Guo-li Ming, MD, PhD; Frances E. Jensen, MD; Catherine S. Woolley, PhD; Cheryl L. Stucky, PhD; Erich D. Jarvis, PhD

Experts will describe their research techniques and accomplishments in a personal context that offers participants a behind-the-scenes look at factors influencing each expert's work. The session will offer an opportunity for students and postdoctoral researchers to engage the expert in an informal dialogue over breakfast. No registration is required, but seating is limited.

Contact: training@sfn.org

Getting the Most Out of SfN: The Annual Meeting and Beyond

Organizer/Moderator: Hermes Yeh, PhD, Elisabeth J. Van Bockstaele, PhD, Amy Jo Stavnezer, PhD
Date & Time: Saturday, October 17, 2015 1pm - 2pm
Location: S101

Panelists: William A. Carlezon, PhD; David R. Riddle, PhD; Cara M. Altimus, PhD

Students, postdocs, and others new to the annual meeting are invited to attend this session where experienced participants will share tips on how to get the most out of the annual meeting experience, both during and after Neuroscience 2015. Whether you are looking for networking strategies or simply ways to make your experience productive and enjoyable, this session will be beneficial. Representatives from the SfN Program Committee, SfN Committee on Neuroscience Departments and Programs, SfN Trainee Advisory Committee, and the Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience will provide strategies for navigating the annual meeting, discuss professional development tools available during and after the meeting, suggest ways to find and use a mentor, and answer questions from session participants.

Contact: mpd@sfn.org

How Do I Fund My Science? Public and Private Funding Approaches for Supporting Your Neuroscience Research Across Career Stages and Types of Research

Organizer/Moderator: Kenneth I. Maynard, PhD
Date & Time: Saturday, October 17, 2015 1:30pm - 5pm
Location: S106

Panelists: William J Martin, PhD; Jim Deshler, PhD; Nancy Desmond, Ph.D.; Hemai Parthasarathy, PhD; Heather Snyder, PhD

All scientists agree that funding is an essential element of research, but not everyone appreciates that funding mechanisms can vary as much as types of research. Which mechanisms are best suited to basic neuroscience, applied research, translational science/medicine, education and career, and large-scale multidisciplinary research? Not all agencies fund all types of research and/or training. What about your research may have commercial value and when is this potential value great enough to form the basis of a company? When should you approach NIH versus NSF, or a private foundation versus a venture capital group? This workshop will address these and other questions including different funding mechanisms that contribute to successful and unsuccessful applications. Brief talks will be followed by an extensive question-and-answer session and an open fair where experts from the different types of funding organizations will be available to address your specific cases. Come hear the latest word from expert professionals from NIH, NSF, a private foundation, and a venture capital company!

Contact: mpd@sfn.org

How to Renovate Your Relationship With Your Advisor or Advisee

Organizer/Moderator: Ian A. Paul, PhD, Michael Levine, PhD, Jennifer L. Raymond, PhD
Date & Time: Saturday, October 17, 2015 3pm - 5pm
Location: S101

Panelists: Samantha Sutton, PhD

The advisor-advisee relationship is arguably the most important in academia. Under the guidance of their PIs, graduate students and postdocs grow into strong, successful professionals. In exchange, these advisees perform the research that builds their PI's reputation and scientific body of work. Despite the importance of the advisor-advisee relationship, relatively little instruction is given to either party on how to build a great relationship. This interactive workshop will provide that instruction.

Contact: training@sfn.org

Career Development Topics: A Networking Event

Organizer/Moderator: . Society for Neuroscience
Support contributed by: Support contributed by: AbbVie, Inc.
Date & Time: Saturday, October 17, 2015 7:30pm - 9:30pm
Location: Hall A

Experienced neuroscientists will offer advice on a wide range of topics in an informal, roundtable format. Topics include work-life balance, securing grants, career transitions, careers away from the bench, choosing graduate schools and postdoctoral fellow positions, and many others. Participants from diverse backgrounds, fields, and work sectors are encouraged to attend.

Contact: mpd@sfn.org

Sunday, October 18, 2015

A Guide to Publishing in Journals

Organizer/Moderator: Toby Charkin
Date & Time: Sunday, October 18, 2015 9am - 11am
Location: S101

Panelists: Jacques Balthazart, PhD; Cindy Lustig, PhD; Ross Hildrew; Kaia Motter; Verity J. Brown, PhD; Michael D. Rugg, PhD; Ted Abel, PhD; Gina Turrigiano, PhD

Journals exist to disseminate new research findings and the latest thinking to scholarly and professional communities worldwide. This workshop will present a rare opportunity to gain insights into journal publishing from the editors and publishers of Elsevier journals such as Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, Neuropsychologia, and NeuroImage. Topics will include how to write and review a paper, new publishing initiatives, and publishing ethics.

Contact: mpd@sfn.org

Creating Connections and Community in Support of Diverse Neuroscientists

Organizer/Moderator: Claire Horner-Devine, PhD
Date & Time: Sunday, October 18, 2015 11:30am - 1:30pm
Location: S101

Panelists: Pamela Scott-Johnson; Joyce Yen, PhD; Antonio A. Nunez, PhD; Gerald D. Griffin, PhD; Ebany Martinez-Finley, PhD; Sheri J.Y. Mizumori, PhD

Developing community and a sense of belonging to the field are important in supporting diverse neuroscientists. Panelists will describe a cohort-based professional development program for early career researchers from underrepresented groups called BRAINS. The panel will share program innovations as well as stories and take-home messages from BRAINS community members. A moderated discussion will offer an opportunity to brainstorm avenues of incorporating BRAINS best practices into your own career or community.

Contact:

Successful Career Advancement through Networking: Is It Who You Know?

Organizer/Moderator: Rebecca Shansky, PhD, Mark G. Baxter, PhD
Date & Time: Sunday, October 18, 2015 11:30am - 1pm
Location: S106

Panelists: Bita Moghaddam, PhD; Benjamin T. Saunders, PhD; Noah Gray, PhD; Bruce McEwen, PhD; Natalie C. Tronson, PhD

Networking can have a powerful effect on a scientist's career trajectory. The organizers and speakers will present tips and advice for successful networking, as well as vignettes from their own careers about times when networking has been key to their success. This event will also highlight different venues for networking (conferences, social media, intradepartmental, etc). Discussion time will allow workshop participants to learn from each other's networking successes (and failures).

Contact: mpd@sfn.org

Internationalizing Your Research, Training, and Funding Experience

Organizer/Moderator: Michael J. Zigmond, PhD
Date & Time: Sunday, October 18, 2015 2pm - 5pm
Location: S106

Panelists: Desire Tshala-Katumbay, MD, PhD; Beth Fischer; Gonzalo E. Torres, PhD; Vijayalakshmi Ravindranath, PhD; Shigang He, PhD; Yuan Liu, PhD

This workshop will focus on several topics of direct relevance to anyone wishing to internationalize their training and research, with a special focus on trainees and faculty from low- or middle-income countries (LMIC) who are interested in obtaining international experiences that they can take back to their home countries. Topics will include the value of an international research experience, advice for selecting a lab and obtaining funding, how to maximize your training experience, and how to return home. The workshop will consist of brief speaker presentations with representatives from India, China, and the United States, a panel, and discussions. After the formal presentations and panel there will be an opportunity to speak with speakers and panelists as well as with public and private agencies offering training and funding.

Contact: mpd@sfn.org

Tackling Challenges in Scientific Rigor: The (Sometimes) Messy Reality of Science

Organizer/Moderator: Barbara Lom, PhD, John H. Morrison, PhD
Support contributed by: Support contributed by: National Institute On Drug Abuse, NIH. Content of this workshop does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
Date & Time: Sunday, October 18, 2015 2pm - 4pm
Location: S101

Panelists: Erin McKiernan, PhD; Deena M. Walker, PhD; Peter R. Rapp, PhD; Phillip G. Popovich, PhD

Rigorous conduct of science is the cornerstone of the scientific endeavor, touching on established practices for experimental design, data analysis, and transparency, as well as other issues like publishing and funding pressures. Knowing how to address these issues is critical for a successful career in science. This workshop will explore practical examples of the challenges and solutions in conducting rigorous science from the real-life examples of neuroscientists at various career stages. It will focus on development of the interpersonal, scientific, and technical skills necessary to address various issues in scientific rigor, such as what to do when you can't replicate a published result, how to get support from a mentor, and how to cope with various career pressures that might affect the quality of your science.

Contact: mpd@sfn.org

Monday, October 19, 2015

Exploring New Communications Channels: Science Blogging

Organizer/Moderator: Scott Thompson, PhD
Date & Time: Monday, October 19, 2015 9am - 11am
Location: S101

Panelists: Bethany R. Brookshire, PhD; Douglas Fields, PhD; Anne K. Churchland, PhD; Bradley Voytek, PhD

This session will provide members with guidance on blogging about science, including how to launch a blog, write effective blog posts, and expand audience reach via social media and other online channels. Guests will include science bloggers who share their personal experiences about what works and does not work in engaging online audiences.

Contact: mpd@sfn.org

Teaching Neuroscience to Nonscientists

Organizer/Moderator: Richard Olivo, PhD
Date & Time: Monday, October 19, 2015 9am - 11am
Location: S106

Panelists: Marc Breedlove, PhD; Lisa A. Gabel, PhD; Christina L. Williams, PhD; Laura E. Been, PhD; Leah A. Roesch; Bevil R. Conway, PhD

This event will look at the best approaches to teaching nonscience majors, topics that are most interesting to nonscientists, and will address if basic chemistry and physics should be taught to students who are not studying science. Panelists will discuss writing textbooks for science-phobic students, sex and gender, botox and behavior, using a best-seller on psychiatric cases to teach neuroscience, and how to teach neuroscience through art and music.

Contact: mpd@sfn.org

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

DEPARTMENTS AND PROGRAMS WORKSHOP: Training the Trainers: New Perspectives on Graduate Training in Neuroscience in the 21st Century

Organizer/Moderator: Hermes Yeh, PhD
Date & Time: Wednesday, October 21, 2015 9am - 11am
Location: S101

Panelists: Victoria Prince, PhD; Jami K. Armbrester

The Departments and Programs Workshop is intended for faculty, program directors, and chairpersons interested in enhancing their graduate programs in neuroscience in the areas of 1) broadening curricula to include preparation for career trajectories in a variety of nonacademic settings (such as through the NIH Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training (BEST) program) and 2) how to effectively use the “individual development plan” (IDP) to advise graduate students about career paths. Presentations will be followed by discussion, networking, and interaction with workshop participants.

Contact: training@sfn.org