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The Society for Neuroscience is the world’s largest organization of scientists and physicians devoted to understanding the brain and nervous system.  Learn more about the field, SfN’s mission, and what we do.

Cover Neuroscience 2014

Find great stories and learn the latest scientific developments about the brain by attending SfN’s annual meeting. With more than 30,000 attendees, Neuroscience 2014, November 15-19 in Washington, DC, is the world's largest source of emerging news on brain science and health. 

Visit BrainFacts.org

Access scientifically vetted resources, multimedia, and background about brain science at BrainFacts.org. The site is dedicated to sharing knowledge about the wonders of the brain and mind, engaging the public in dialogue about brain research, and dispelling common "neuromyths." A public information initiative of The Kavli Foundation, the Gatsby Charitable Foundation, and the Society for Neuroscience, BrainFacts.org is a resource for the general public, policymakers, educators, and students of all ages.

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Stay current on scientific topics that are important to you. Follow the Society on Facebook and @SfNtweets, and neuroscience news that's making headlines (provided by BrainFacts.org).


Recent Articles from
Brainfacts

This image shows the brains of monogamous prairie voles, with oxytocin receptors labeled in light blue, red, and yellow. When researchers used genetic techniques to increase oxytocin receptor levels in the brain (right column), they found female voles formed partner preferences faster.

Oxytocin: Bonding, Birth, and Trust

Source: Society for Neuroscience
Efforts to uncover nature's way of initiating labor led to the basic science discovery of a brain chemical that is involved in a host of social behaviors.

Science Fair Project Ideas

Source: Science Buddies
Get engaged in neuroscience with a variety of hands-on science experiments on a number of brain-related topics.

Contact SfN

If you have questions, email media@sfn.org or call (202) 962-4097.

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Neuroscience in the News

brought to you by BrainFacts.org

Youth Football May Factor into Memory Lapses in NFL Vets: Study

Source: NBC News

A new study suggests there might be benefits to starting tackle football at a later age.

Brain Cells behind Overeating

Source: The Scientist

Scientists have defined neurons responsible for excessive food consumption at an unprecedented level of detail.

Bird Brain? Study Says Chicks Count like We Do

Source: The Guardian

Findings suggest chicks might share human tendency to map numbers from the lowest on left, to highest on right.

Regular Beer-Drinking Could Help Ward off Alzheimer's and Parkinson's

Source: Daily Mail

A chemical in hops could slow the progression of degenerative diseases.

Study Could Determine Link Between Pro Football & Brain Injuries

Source: CBS

A new study could help determine if there is a direct link between long-term brain injuries and NFL players.

News from SfN

Weekly Advocacy News Roundup

Read advocacy news from the week of Jan. 23, 2015.

The Journal of Neuroscience Welcomes New Editor-in-Chief

Dora Angelaki officially began her tenure as editor-in-chief ofThe Journal of Neuroscience on January 1.

New Editor-in-Chief of BrainFacts.org: John Morrison

Longtime SfN member and leader John Morrison took the helm as editor-in-chief of BrainFacts.org on January 1. 

Weekly Advocacy News Roundup

Read advocacy news from the week of Jan. 16, 2015.

New Editor-in-Chief Takes Helm of BrainFacts.org

John Morrison, PhD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai began his term on January 1 as editor-in-chief of BrainFacts.org.

Contact SfN

If you have questions, email media@sfn.org or call (202) 962-4097.

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